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Success Stories

  • Case Study: USAID helps farmers recover their land and promotes protection on land restitution judges:

    USAID helps farmers recover their land and promotes protection on land restitution judges: conflicts over land is one cause of the armed conflict in Colombia, a country with the one of the highest rates of internally displaced persons. Many of those affected have no formal rights to the properties they occupy. Camilo Restrepo, a former Minister of Agriculture, reported in El Espectador on 05/26/16 that four million hectares had been abandoned and two dispossessed from their owners over the last 25 years. To address this issue, the Victims’ and Land Restitution Law of 2011 offers an opportunity for the disadvantaged to preserve and recover their land.
  • CASE STUDY: SUCCESFUL COORDINATION BETWEEN FORMAL AND INDIGENOUS JUSTICE SYSTEMS

    According to the National Organization of Indigenous Peoples of Colombia, there are 102 indigenous communities in the country, 1,378,884 citizens as stated by the 2005 DANE census, who have historically faced exclusion, extreme poverty, and inequality. Additionally, coordination between Colom-bia's formal and indigenous justice systems is traditionally weak due to both jurisdictions’ lack of knowledge concerning the indigenous system.
  • CASE STUDY: PAPERLESS PROCESS, USAID SUPPORTS INNOVATIVE PILOT PROJECT IN THE LAND RESTITUTION JURISDICTION

    Every day, the Colombian Constitutional Court receives approximately 1,500 paper tutela actions, a judicial mechanism used to claim immediate protection of constitutional rights. The Court evaluates these actions to determine whether or not they should be adjudicated; if so, they must be decided within three months. Because tutela actions constitute an effective access to justice mechanism, their numbers are very high; unfortunately, there are not enough officials to process them within the required timeframe. The paper forms are stored in bundles while awaiting processing. The excessive weight of these bundles caused the fourth floor of the Court’s building to collapse on October 17, 2014.
  • Case study: National Thematic Committees on Land Restitution Created with USAID Assistance

    The Judicial Branch in Colombia is based on a centralized structure that does not include participatory decision-making processes. In order to promote a mechanism that encourages better practices in the system, the USAID Access to Justice Activity (AJA) supported the Superior Council of the Judiciary (SCJ) in creating permanent thematic work committees as a part of the land restitution jurisdiction with the objective of strengthening judicial governance for these specialized courts.
  • Case study: Mobile Justice Brigades Arrive for Families in Extreme Poverty

    The Access to Justice Activity’s agreement to work with the Na-tional Agency for Overcoming Extreme Poverty (ANSPE) strengthens access to justice for families in extreme poverty.





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